The Property Brothers’ Best Small-Space Renovations for 2021

Property BrothersHGTV

Drew and Jonathan Scott of “Property Brothers” know that nearly all of us could use more space (particularly as the pandemic drags on and on). Now that the new year’s first episode of “Celebrity IOU” has arrived, they’ve broken out their top tricks for opening up a small house without breaking the bank.

In the Season 2 episode, “Rainn Wilson’s Surprise,” the Scotts meet the actor Rainn Wilson, of “The Office,” who wants to give his beloved nanny, Leslie, a living-room makeover.

Leslie’s Los Angeles home could definitely use it, given that the space is seriously dated and undeniably cramped. With her kids (and nieces and nephews) often running around the house, Wilson knows that this living space needs to be more kid-friendly, too.

Read on to find out how Drew and Jonathan open up this small living space, which might inspire some upgrades around your own home, too.

Remove kitchen cabinets to open up more space

Rainn Wilson
Rainn Wilson shows Drew and Jonathan Scott how much work needs to be done in the kitchen.

HGTV

When Wilson brings Drew and Jonathan to Leslie’s home, one of the first things the brothers notice is the kitchen’s cabinets.

The row of cabinets blocks sightlines to the living space and makes the kitchen feel separated from the rest of the house. Jonathan explains that the style is typical of the era the home was built in, but says it’s not a great feature for those who are making the meals.

“Whoever’s in there, all of a sudden, it feels like a cave,” Jonathan says.

kitchen
This kitchen was so closed off that it wasn’t functional for a house with kids.

HGTV

So, the brothers remove some cabinets and, to make up for the missing cabinet space, add smarter storage to the rest of the kitchen (like adding lots of drawers to the island).

In the end, the kitchen is beautiful, functional, and flows with the rest of the living space. Leslie will never miss those cabinets!

kitchen
With the floating shelves out of the way, this kitchen is much more open.

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Create more storage with built-in benches and hutches

storage
The brothers know that a house with kids needs plenty of storage.

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Wilson knows that Leslie and her children could always use more storage.

“One thing is, there’s a lot of kids bouncin’ around in here,” Wilson tells the Scott brothers when they first tour the house.

Luckily, the brothers have a solution to help this family organize its stuff: stylish built-ins.

hutch
This hutch created convenient storage, but it was too small.

HGTV

Drew and Jonathan add some built-in benches under the living room window, providing plenty of storage space under the seats. Then, they expand on the built-in dining room hutch, making it twice as big, for holding twice as much.

These two built-in storage solutions are perfect, because they don’t take up space, as a bulky piece of furniture would, and they leave the whole room open as a kids’ play space. It’s a great workaround for this family’s storage issue.

hutch
This larger hutch is much more convenient.

HGTV

Brighten beams to make a room seem taller

ceiling
These beams were beautiful, but the brothers felt that they were too dark.

HGTV

Jonathan and Drew like the wood beams in Leslie’s living room, but they worry that the dark color makes the room feel more closed in.

“From the moment we walked in, we noticed the dark beams and that high, recessed, rough-ridged ceiling. It was sucking the light out of the space,” Drew says.

But the color isn’t the only problem. The brothers notice that this room doesn’t have any ceiling lights, which makes this room even darker.

ceiling
Painted white, the beams brighten the space.

HGTV

So Jonathan and Drew paint the beams white and add white shiplap-style ceiling panels.

“Not only do they add brightness,” Jonathan says of the panels, “but they’re also going to be dropped down to accommodate new recessed lighting.”

In the end, not only does the new color make the space feel brighter, but the added lights literally light up the room.

Large doors make a small house feel bigger

Rainn Wilson
Wilson discusses new doors with Drew and Jonathan.

HGTV

While Leslie’s living room is laid out well, the space is relatively small. Although the brothers can’t add to the square footage of the house, Jonathan has the idea to expand the living space by improving the flow into the back patio.

“We could do something really cool with these sliders,” Jonathan says of the existing doors. “We could swap them out for, like, collapsible glass panels. They could flow in and out. It would be great.”

door
All that natural light really brightens up the living room.

HGTV

The brothers open up the walls and install large, collapsible window doors from two sides, making both the family room and dining space open onto the backyard.

To complete the effect, they update the patio by adding new flooring and new furniture. In the end, the living space feels twice as big!

patio
Two doors open up to the patio, making the living room seem far more open.

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Don’t go overboard with too much white

fireplace
This fireplace needed a new look.

HGTV

While the Scotts know that it’s important to brighten up a space, they also know that with the walls, ceiling, and kitchen all in white, the space could use some contrast. So they redo the white fireplace with a unique brown finish.

“This is just made out of marble powder, lime, and sand,” Jonathan says, as he applies a clay mixture to the fireplace face.

Some techniques, he says, come from Italy, and from different regions of Europe, but this one, from Morocco, is called tadelakt.

fireplace
With unique materials, the brothers turn this old fireplace into a modern feature.

HGTV

The light-brown color looks perfect in the space. The finish adds dimension without darkening the area, and the modern fireplace shape is much better suited to children, because there’s no mantel to climb on or base to trip over.

Best of all, this modern fireplace looks clean and elegant.

“I love that it looks like a five-star hotel,” Drew says of the new finish. “That’s the kind of feature you want to have.”

When Wilson finally brings Leslie and her family back to the house, she’s amazed by how spacious and elegant her living room looks. Let this serve as a reminder that just a few small changes can make even small spaces feel huge.

The post The Property Brothers’ Best Small-Space Renovations for 2021 appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

Health Insurance Myths Debunked

A health insurance policy is essential for anyone seeking to safeguard their future and avoid the catastrophic consequences of high medical bills. Whether you’re buying coverage for yourself or a health plan for your family, it’s important to get complete coverage. But despite this fact, millions of Americans remain uninsured, often because they believe one of the following health insurance myths.

Myth 1: I’m Young and Healthy; I Don’t Need Health Insurance

You’re never too young to start shopping for health insurance plans because you don’t know what’s around the corner. Medical expenses can be astronomical at any age and anyone can have an accident, fall ill or be diagnosed with a serious disease. 

It’s not pleasant to think about and many people prefer to bury their heads in the sand and live as if they are invincible, but they’re not. No one is.

Health care is very expensive in the United States, there’s no escaping that fact. This is one of the few developed nations in the world where being the victim of an accident or attack could lead to insurmountable medical expenses and essentially ruin your life. You can’t rely on luck and you can’t assume you’ll be safe just because you’re young, fit, and healthy.

In fact, buying at this young age has many benefits, including the fact that you’ll likely clear all exclusion periods by the time you actually need to start claiming.

Myth 2: The Benefits are Lost if I Don’t Renew by the Due Date

You should always try to pay your monthly premium on time, thus avoiding any issues and ensuring you are covered at all times. However, your health insurance coverage does not end the minute you miss a payment.

Insurance companies have a grace period, during which time your policy will remain active. This period allows you to gather the funds needed and to pay your monthly premium, thus keeping your policy active. 

Typically, this grace period lasts for between 7 and 15 days, but it differs from provider to provider. Check your policy for more details but try to avoid playing fast and loose with your payments as they could be the only thing protecting you.

Myth 3: It’s All About the Deductible

The deductible is the amount of money you pay before the health insurance policy takes over and to many consumers, it is the single most important part of any health insurance policy. However, while it is important to consider the deductible, you should not choose your policies based solely on which one has the lowest deductible.

Look for the sort of cover that they provide and whether this will suit your needs or not, and then focus on the deductible. 

It’s also important to find the right balance between a deductible that is cheap enough for you to afford when the time comes, but is not so cheap that it sends the premiums through the roof. To do this, avoid focusing on how much your first monthly payment will cost and ask yourself what you would do if you had to pay for a medical expense today.

Would you have an issue paying the deductible? Would it require you to borrow money from friends or family? If so, it’s too high and it’s time to go back to the drawing board.

Myth 4: I Have Insurance from My Employer so I Don’t Need any Additional Cover

If your employer offers any kind of group health insurance cover, take it, but don’t assume that it will cover you for everything you need. Read the small print, look for gaps, and seek to fill those gaps with your own cover.

With your own policy, you’ll also be protected if you lose your life. If anything happens in the time it takes you to find a new job, you could be left to foot the bill, making this an even scarier and more stressful time. But if you’re covered, you can take your time as you search for a suitable role.

Myth 5: It’s Not a Pre-Existing Condition if I Didn’t Know About it

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions you will be subject to an exclusion period, one that may last for up to 48 months. During this time, your insurance company will not pay out for any issues related to this condition and contrary to popular belief, not knowing about the condition is not enough to avoid this exclusion period.

If, somehow, it is proven that you had a medical condition that was simply not discovered at the time you applied, it will still be subject to an exclusion period. The good news, however, is that you can no longer be refused because of pre-existing medical conditions, which means that everyone can benefit from health insurance.

Myth 6: I Don’t Need Health Insurance If I Have a Life Insurance Plan

A life insurance policy can cover you for critical illness, which could be used to cover health care costs. You can also purchase accident and dismemberment insurance to cover you in the event you lose a limb. However, life insurance is designed to pay out a death benefit when you die. It goes to your loved ones, not you, and is therefore not a viable replacement for health insurance.

For complete cover, you should look into getting both life insurance and health insurance. You can find low-cost options for both.

Summary: Common Myths Debunked

If you don’t have any health insurance coverage, it’s time to change that and start looking for coverage today. Take a look at our guide to choosing a health plan to get started. We also have guides on everything from life insurance (term life insurance, whole life insurance, and other life insurance coverage) car insurance and pretty much all other insurance products.

By purchasing all of these together you could even save some money while getting essential coverage! Just remember to do your research, plan ahead, and never settle for less than you need as you may live to regret it in the future.

Health Insurance Myths Debunked is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

How Much Are You Losing By Doing Non-Promotable Work?

Every office has non-promotable work that needs to be done, including tasks like planning birthday parties, organizing happy hours, and taking out the trash. While your team appreciates these things being done and they contribute to the overall culture of your workplace, performing these duties won’t get you promoted the same way expanding revenue streams will. 

Unfortunately, non-promotable work is disproportionately assigned to and completed by women in the workplace, directly impacting their career trajectory and finances. Research from the Harvard Business Review found that women were 48% more likely to volunteer for a task than men in mixed-gender groups. However, when groups were separated by gender, men and women had similar rates of volunteering — implying that there’s a shared expectation for women to volunteer for an unfavorable task.

It may seem beneficial to volunteer for any task at work, but non-promotable work outside of your job description is of little interest to management and doesn’t really help your company grow. If you’re looking to advance your career, your first step is to ask your manager what they’re looking for from you. In some cases, you may need to expand your skillset. Consider boot camps, conferences, and classes you can attend. If your employer is looking for someone who is proactive, then dive into the numbers and read up on industry trends to build impressive forecasting reports. You should also look for project opportunities that offer a high return on investment and chances to work with the company’s high-level managers.

Those who volunteer for committees and office maintenance tasks are redirecting their time from their high value, daily responsibilities to low-value office maintenance projects — which may ultimately hinder their quarterly reviews, visibility in the workplace, and their chances for promotions and raises. Invest your time in promotable tasks that will get you seen and open career opportunities to improve your financial health.

What are you losing by performing non-promotable work

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Workfront | CNBC | Harvard Business Review | Business News Daily | Bentley University Center For Women and Business | Institute for Women’s Policy Research

The post How Much Are You Losing By Doing Non-Promotable Work? appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Marital Debt After Divorce: Who is Responsible?

The average couple has a number of topics to discuss on their to-do list before heading to the altar. The least romantic topics, if they even make the list at all, are probably concerning debt and the possibility of divorce. If you foresee a divorce in your future or are currently going through one, it’s safe to say that you have some burning questions about your finances. Perhaps you and your spouse acquired some debt during the course of your marriage and you’re now wondering who is going to be responsible for what. While it’s important to note that each situation is unique, there are some ground rules in the Divorced with Debt arena. In the below sections, we’ll address the usual ways in which debt is divided up between each spouse.

Community Property vs. Common Law Property Rules

If you’re trying to figure out what debts you will be responsible post-divorce, you will first need to know if you live in an equitable distribution state that follows common law or if you live in a community property state. When it comes to debt and the divorce process, most states follow common law for property, meaning that following a divorce, each ex-spouse will be held responsible for the debt that they took on. In a community property state, both spouses, considered to be the “community,” may both end up equally responsible for debt that incurred throughout the marriage, known as “community debt.” The following states are Community Property States:

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Idaho
  • Louisiana
  • Nevada
  • New Mexico
  • Texas
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin

Most of the time, the banks aren’t interested in how the courts decide to split up your debt. Even after a divorce, the original contract or credit card agreement will typically overrule a divorce decree. This means that if the original agreement was set up under your spouse’s name, the banks are going to expect the payments to be as such. As you can imagine, this could potentially cause problems with an ex-spouse who is being asked to pay off debt that is not under their name, or at least under a joint account.

To put it into perspective, let’s imagine that the court orders your ex-spouse to make payments on credit card debt under your name. If your ex neglects to make the payments on time, it’s going to have an effect on your credit report. The good news is that if this happens, you have a right to pursue legal action against your former spouse for not following court orders. However, it’s possible that by the time legal action is taken, your credit score may already be damaged.

Prenuptial agreements will affect these outcomes as well. Depending on yours and your spouse’s marital assets, the debt in question will vary. Here are the typical categories of debt that are affected during divorce proceedings:

  • Credit Card Debt
  • Mortgage Debt
  • Auto Loan Debt
  • Medical Debt

Credit Card Debt

It’s possible that you could be responsible for your former spouse’s credit card debt, but it’s not likely. If you have a joint account, then the outcomes may vary. Usually, marital debt is considered to be any debt that was created during the time of the marriage. So if you racked up credit card debt under a joint account, expect that both of you will be equally responsible for paying it off.

Mortgage Debt

If both spouses have their names on the mortgage, the easiest way of solving the mortgage debt is to sell the house and divide the earnings between both parties. It might be tempting to keep the home for a multitude of reasons, but at the end of the day, selling the property and splitting the money is usually the least complicated solution for everyone involved.

Once the house is on the market, it’s time to start communicating with your former spouse about who is going to be responsible for what amount. Come up with an agreement on who will pay which portion of the mortgage, so that neither parties’ credit score is negatively affected.

If selling the home and dividing the earnings isn’t a viable option for you and your ex, then one of you will end up fully responsible for the debt. In most cases, mortgage debt following a divorce is assigned to:

  • The spouse with the higher annual income.

OR

  • The spouse who gains full custody of the children.

When this happens, one spouse will have to buy out the other spouse’s equity in the property.

Car Loan Debt

When it comes to car loans, things become more complicated. If the car loan has both names on it, here are the two best options:

  • Refinance the car without your ex.
  • Propose automatic payments to come directly from your former spouse’s account.

Let’s say one person ends up with the car loan debt, but the other person was also on the loan as a cosigner. Unfortunately, if one spouse is held responsible for picking up the tab on a debt, and they neglect their payments, both parties can suffer those consequences.

Medical Debt

Each state has different laws surrounding medical debt and divorce agreements. If you live in a Community Property state, you might have to pay for your former spouse’s medical debt. However, if you live in a state that follows common law, the court will ultimately make the decision about who is responsible for what debt.

Pay off your debt before the divorce is finalized

 If you and your spouse can find a way to work out the kinks of your debt issues before the divorce is finalized, it’ll make things a lot easier in the long run. Work together to figure out who should be responsible for which debt, so that you can lower your chances of having to pay off a debt that isn’t yours.

If you’re working with credit card debt, one of you may need to transfer your credit card balance to a separate card. Consolidating your credit card balances is another common option when dividing debts.

Generally, credit card debt is going to be easier to deal with than the big things, like home loans and car loans. In many cases, couples who are going through a divorce will have to consider refinancing their loans under one party’s name.

Keep in mind that the original loan agreement supercedes the divorce agreement, so if you wait until your divorce is finalized, you might have a harder time moving things around. You can ask your lender to take your name off of an account and have it replaced with your former spouse’s name, but be prepared to provide the divorce decree as evidence. If it doesn’t work out this way, then seek legal advice from your divorce attorney about your options. Another common solution is to sell the asset in question and use the earnings to pay off the debt.

How your former spouse’s bankruptcy can affect you

If your ex-spouse isn’t able to keep up with the payments on their share of the debt, they might decide to file bankruptcy. This could cause problems for you if you didn’t choose to file as well.

Filing for bankruptcy does not erase the debts, instead it erases your ex-spouse’s liability for the debt. In this instance, you could find yourself in a situation where the creditor is now pursuing you for the debt. It’s also important that you check your credit report. Even if you weren’t the one who filed bankruptcy, it could still end up on your credit report.

Be cautious about any joint accounts you may still have open post-divorce. If you leave joint accounts open and your former spouse has access to them, he or she could potentially transfer balances from other accounts onto those ones. Safeguard your credit by paying off any debts you can manage to pay off ahead of time, so that you don’t have to worry about it later.

Marital Debt After Divorce: Who is Responsible? is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Should you get a corporate credit card?

Whether your employees fly a lot and need a card to reserve plane tickets or they purchase lumber or office supplies for the company at the store, getting them a company credit card is often a great way to keep track of expenses and make it easy for them to purchase what’s needed.

For many entrepreneurs, a small business credit card is the best solution. Many are designed to reward the types of purchases that employees typically make in a small firm.

However, for larger small businesses, getting a corporate credit card, like the ones big corporations issue to employees, often makes sense.

See related: How to get a business credit card

What is a corporate credit card?

Corporate cards are generally available only to larger small businesses, meaning those with at least several million dollars in annual revenue. A company may have to submit a federal tax ID and undergo an audit of its financials to qualify.

For example, the One Card from Capital One requires its users to have a minimum annual card spend over $1 million. Cards are issued to the company itself (rather than any individual) and require that you submit your tax ID and require an audit of company financials before approval.

Similarly, the One Card from J.P. Morgan is available to businesses that spend between $1 million and $9.9 million per year. The bank can also match companies that spend $20 million or more on travel with corporate credit cards.

Once an account has been opened, the company is responsible for paying the balance in full each billing cycle and managing spending of each cardholder. However, it is also the company that reaps any rewards the card may include, including statement credits or travel perks. In the case of the One Card from Capital One, businesses earn competitive rewards up to 1.5X net purchases.

Corporate credit card pros and cons

The biggest perk attached to corporate cards is the ease of tracking employee spending. Rather than having employees make personal charges and submit expense reports or receipts for reimbursement, the company can easily manage spend limits, track budget needs and manage fraud risk. Most corporate cards offer detailed analytics all in one system about where and how company money is being spent.

Since these cards are sometimes more complex, corporate cards often come with their own designated customer service representative who can help resolve any issues quickly. These representatives are usually on-call 24/7 and have an intricate knowledge of each company’s individual needs.

Pros

  • Simplified tracking and analysis of work-related purchases
  • Benefits and rewards help the company directly
  • Dedicated or on-call customer service representative
  • Prevents employees from trying to make personal charges on a company card with clearer visibility and better spending controls than most business cards

Cons

  • Additional cardholder fees can add up quickly
  • Not an option for smaller companies
  • Tough application process
  • Employees can’t earn their own rewards by using a personal card and getting reimbursed

See related: Managing employee cards on your credit card account

How corporate cards differ from small business credit cards

Both corporate and small business cards offer conveniences such as the ability to set limits on employees’ spending and to restrict spending to certain categories. Most also offer features that make it possible to track expenses easily.

However, corporate cards come with certain benefits that small business cards don’t offer – and vice versa.

Availability

Unlike corporate credit cards, business cards are available to any-sized business – even entrepreneurs just getting started on their own. The application process is much less intensive and usually doesn’t require an audit of company finances.

Responsibility for the debt

Business cards are issued to an individual and the company (unless it is a sole proprietor), and even if additional cards are added for employees, the business owner is responsible for managing payments.

Typically, a small business owner must personally guarantee a small business card, though some small business cards come with joint and several liability, where the owner shares liability with the business. With joint and several liability, a creditor can pursue either the business or the owner for a debt.

With most corporate cards, the company is generally liable for the debt on employees’ cards, which is a big advantage in many owners’ eyes. When the company guarantees the debt, the owner is not held responsible if, for instance, the company fails without paying its bills.

Some corporate cards also offer what’s known as individual liability. That means the employee must stay current on paying the bill in the short term and request reimbursement upon filing an expense report. This is less common than it used to be. It’s not necessarily ideal for employees, who may not have the cash available to pay for large charges until their expense report is processed.

Credit CARD Act doesn’t apply to business or corporate accounts. But many card issuers grant those CARD Act protections anyway, as a matter of practice. Nevertheless, don’t take anything for granted. Before using your corporate or business card, familiarize yourself with its rules.

Credit impact

While corporate cards are typically used for work-related travel and accommodation, business cards can be used to make all sorts of work purchases, including supplies or merchandise. This allows even small businesses to build a great credit profile. By using a business card to make larger payments, business owners can avoid racking up charges on their personal credit cards while steadily building their business credit.

With small business cards, employees are considered authorized users. As a result, their card activity may be reported to credit bureaus.

For some employees, this is a drawback. For instance, if they have put expenses from a costly business trip on their card, they may find their credit utilization is high enough to affect their personal credit. That could be a problem if, for instance, they are applying for a mortgage.

In contrast, with a corporate card, card usage does not affect employees’ personal credit. That is a big plus from an employee’s point of view.

See related: Should I wait until my business is more established to get a credit card?

Cost

Small business credit cards tend to have fewer fees, including no additional charge for employee cards with cards such as Capital One Spark Cash for Business the Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card from Chase.

Corporate cards generally charge for this and may charge as much as $100 a year or more. This is because they often offer more robust features, like access to a specific sales rep or access to enterprise software for filing expense reports.

Of course, if you run a larger small business, the extra benefits may be worth it. It all depends on the needs of your business.

Should you get a corporate card for your business?

While corporate cards offer a wide range of great benefits such as easy expense tracking, dedicated customer service representatives and no liability for individual employees, they are typically only available to large corporations with millions in annual revenue.

If you own a small business, a business credit card can help steadily build a credit history for your company. Business cards can also help you make large purchases to pay off over time.

Source: creditcards.com

Tips to Consolidate Credit Card Debt

Tips to Consolidate Credit Card Debt

Editorial Note: This content is not provided by the credit card issuer. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer.

If left unchecked, extensive amounts of credit card debt can cripple your finances. The good news is there are many ways to handle debt, though each requires a dedicated effort on your part. But if you can manage to consolidate credit card debt, you will reduce your burden relatively quickly. In the process, you’ll avoid the exorbitant interest rates that accompany most credit cards. Below we take a look at some of the most effective techniques you can use to make this goal a reality.

Find Out Your Credit Score

Before you can work on improving your credit and minimizing your debt, you have to know where you currently stand.

Many credit card issuers allow cardholders to see their FICO® credit score free of charge once a month, so check out if any of your cards include that free credit score. The three major credit bureaus – TransUnion, Experian and Equifax – also give out free annual credit reports. If that’s not enough, websites like Credit Karma™ and Credit Sesame provide a free look at your credit score and reports as well.

It is vital to review your credit report with a fine-tooth comb to ensure the accuracy of the information. If you find errors be sure to let the credit bureau in question know so the issue can be eradicated as soon as possible.

Zero Interest Balance Transfer Cards

Although it might seem counterintuitive to apply for another credit card to lessen your debt, a zero interest balance transfer card could really help. These cards typically include an introductory 0% balance transfer Annual Percentage Rate (APR) for six months or more. This ultimately allows you to move debt from one account to another without incurring more interest. However, once the introductory offer concludes, any leftover balances will revert to your base APR.

These offers aren’t totally free, though. Most cards also charge a balance transfer fee that’s usually between 3% and 5% of the transfer. Even with this initial payment, you will almost always still save money over leaving your debt where it stands currently.

If you want to consolidate credit card debt, here are three different balance transfer credit cards you could apply for, with varying introductory interest rates and transfer fees:

Balance Transfer Credit Cards Card Intro Balance Transfer APR Balance Transfer Fee Chase Slate 0% APR for first 15 months; then 16.49% to 25.24% Variable APR, depending on your creditworthiness No fee for first 60 days; then $5 or 5% of each transfer, whichever is greater Citi Double Cash Card 0% introductory APR for 18 months from date of first transfer when transfers are completed within 4 months from date of account opening; then 15.49% to 25.49% Variable APR, depending on your creditworthiness $5 or 3% of each transfer, whichever is greater BankAmericard® credit card 0% APR for first 15 billing cycles; then 14.49% to 24.49% Variable APR, depending on your creditworthiness No fee for first 60 days; then $10 or 3% of each transfer, whichever is greater Take Out a Personal Loan

Tips to Consolidate Credit Card Debt

The thought of taking out another loan probably doesn’t sound too appetizing to consolidate credit card debt. But a personal debt consolidation loan is one of the speediest ways to rid yourself of credit card debt. More specifically, you can use it to pay off most or all of your debt in one lump sum. That way, your payments are all merged into a single account with your lender.

The APR and length of the offered loan and the minimum credit score needed for approval are the main factors that should go into your final decision on a lender. By concentrating on these three components of the loan, you can map out what your monthly payments will be. As a result, you can more easily implement them into your financial life.

Applying for a personal consolidation loan can have a detrimental effect on your credit. Unfortunately, most institutions will run a hard credit check on you prior to approval. However, many online lenders don’t do this, which might ease your mind depending on the severity of your debt situation.

These loans are available through a wide variety of financial institutions, including banks, online lenders and credit unions. Here are a few examples of some of the most common debt consolidation lenders:

Common Debt Consolidation Lenders Banks Wells Fargo, U.S. Bank, Fifth Third Bank Online Lenders Lending Club, Prosper, Best Egg Credit Unions Navy Federal Credit Union, Unify Financial Credit Union, Affinity Federal Credit Union Auto or Home Equity Loan

If you own assets like a home or car, you can take out a lump-sum loan based on the equity you hold in them to consolidate credit card debt. This is a great way to reuse money you paid toward an existing loan to take care of your debt. When paying back your auto or home equity loan, you’ll usually pay in fixed amounts at a relatively low interest rate. Even if this rate isn’t great, it’s likely much better than any offer you’d receive from a card issuer.

Equity loans are technically a second mortgage or loan, meaning your house or car will become the loan’s collateral. That means you could lose your house or car if you cannot keep up with your equity loan payments.

Create a Budget

Tips to Consolidate Credit Card Debt

To build a budget, you first need to figure out your approximate monthly net income. Don’t forget to take into account taxes when you’re doing this.

You can then start subtracting your variable and fixed expenses that are expected for the upcoming month. This is where you will likely be able to identify where you’re overspending, whether it’s on food, entertainment or travel. Once you’ve completed this, you can begin cutting back where you need to. Then, use your surplus cash to pay off your debt one month at a time.

It shouldn’t matter if you’re dealing with substantial credit card debt or not. A monthly spending budget should always be a part of how you manage your finances. While this is likely the slowest way to eliminate debt, it’s also the most financially sound. At its core, it attempts to fix the problem without taking funding from an outside source. This should leave very little financial strife in the aftermath of paying off your debt.

Professional Debt Counseling

Perhaps since you’ve found yourself in serious debt, you feel like you want professional help getting out of it. Well the National Foundation for Credit Counseling® (NFCC®) is available for just that reason. The NFCC® has member offices all around the U.S. that are certified in helping you consolidate credit card debt.

These counselors won’t only address your current financial issues and debt. They’ll also work to create a plan that will help you avoid this situation again in the future.

Agencies that are accredited by the NFCC® will have it clearly displayed on their website or at their offices. If you’re not sure where to look, the foundation created an agency locator that’ll help you find a counselor nearby.

Borrow From Your Retirement

Taking money early from your employer-sponsored retirement account obviously isn’t ideal. That’s means borrowing from your retirement is a last-ditch alternative. But if your credit card debt has become such a handicap that it’s affecting all other facets of your life, it is a viable option to consolidate credit card debt.

Because you are technically loaning money to yourself, this will not show up on your credit report. Major tax and penalty charges await anyone who has trouble making payments on these loans though. To make matters worse, if you quit your job or are fired, you’re typically only given 60 days to finish paying it off to avoid incurring a penalty.

Tips To Consolidate Credit Card Debt

  • If you take the time to come up with a budget, don’t let it go to waste. While you might find it tough to stick to, especially if you’re trying to cut back, it is the best way to manage your money correctly. Even if a budget becomes habit, stay vigilant with where your money is being spent.
  • Although a financial advisor will cost money, he or she might be able to help you keep your finances in check while ultimately helping you plan for the future as well. However, if this isn’t an option for you financially, stay on track with your NFCC® debt counselor’s plan.
  • There are so many ways to gain access to your credit score that there’s virtually no excuse for not knowing it. It doesn’t matter if you do it through one of the top three credit bureaus, FICO® or one of your card issuers. Just remember to pay attention to those ever-important three digits as often as possible.

Editorial Note: This content is not provided by the credit card issuer. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Liderina, ©iStock.com/ferrantraite, Â©iStock.com/cnythzl

The post Tips to Consolidate Credit Card Debt appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

Tim Tebow Sells One of His Homes in Jacksonville, FL, for $1.4M

Tim Tebow Sells Jacksonville HouseJohn Lamparski/Getty Images

The former NFL quarterback Tim Tebow has successfully sold one of his Jacksonville, FL, homes for $1.4 million.

As it happens, the buyer has a tie to the sports world. The new owner, Robin Ann Eletto, is chief people officer at Fanatics, Inc., which sells officially licensed sports merchandise.

After washing out on the gridiron, Tebow switched his career path to baseball. Back in 2014, he bought this home for $1.4 million, while still trying to make a go of it in the NFL. In the end, he came out about even with the sale.

Tebow and his wife, Demi-Leigh Tebow, had listed the property for $1.7 million last June. The couple went on to drop the price to $1.6 million before it sold in December.

Built in 2000, the two-story property in a gated community features a large, 6,600-square-foot interior, with five bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms. Set on nearly an acre, the gracious estate looks out to 175 feet of water frontage. 

Inside, the layout contains a gourmet kitchen with Sub-Zero fridge, brick cooktop niche, and Thermador double ovens, plus a butler’s pantry. The kitchen opens to a family room, as well as a sunroom with brick flooring and a wet bar.

The layout, which features touches of brick and wood, also has a formal dining room with built-ins and a coffered ceiling.

A remodeled owner’s suite on the first floor features an en suite marble bath and dual vanities.

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Watch: QB Drew Brees Looks to Unload His Amazing Kauai Condo

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Upstairs offers three bedroom suites, a study, game room with deck, a media room, and an office that could be used as another bedroom.

Outside is a screened lanai with a summer kitchen, which leads to a pergola, fire pit, and a colorful azalea garden overlooking the lake and golf course.

Tebow owns another home in the city’s Glen Kernan Golf & Country Club, which he bought in 2019.

Now 33, Tebow was a superstar in college, at the University of Florida, where he won the Heisman Trophy in 2007. In 2010, he was drafted by the Denver Broncos, but wasn’t able to replicate his collegiate success.

He then switched sports to baseball, joining the New York Mets organization and playing for their minor league affiliates. He also appears on ESPN and the SEC Network as a football analyst.

Jacksonville agent Debbie Tufts of Engel & Völkers represented the buyer in the sale. Julie Little Brewer with Re/Max Specialists repped the seller.

The post Tim Tebow Sells One of His Homes in Jacksonville, FL, for $1.4M appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

Best credit cards for Lyft

Only a decade ago, people called a taxi company when they needed a ride. The same act is now as simple as hitting a few buttons on your smartphone.

Ride-share companies like Lyft make getting a ride to almost anywhere a breeze, and the service may cost a lot less than you think.

If you charge your Lyft rides to a credit card that doles out points or miles, that’s even better. In this guide, we’ll go over the absolute best credit cards to use when you ride with Lyft as well as other ways to maximize your ride-share dollars.

See related: Everything you need to know about maximizing rewards on ride-shares

Chase Sapphire Reserve®: Best for Lyft discounts

  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card: Best for extra value at a lower fee
  • American Express® Green Card: Best for budget-minded travelers
  • Wells Fargo Propel American Express® card: Best no annual fee card for ride shares
  • Best credit cards to earn rewards with Lyft

    There are a handful of credit cards that can help you earn rewards each time you ride with Lyft. Here are your best options:

    See related: Best cards for Uber, UberEATS

    Chase Sapphire Reserve®: Best for Lyft discounts

    In January 2020, the Chase Sapphire Reserve began to offer a one-year complimentary Lyft Pink membership. For a $19.99 monthly fee, Lyft Pink offers passengers 15% off all car rides, in addition to priority airport pickups, special discounts and more flexibility in cancellations, among other benefits. The Reserve is also offering 10 points per dollar on Lyft purchases through March 2022.

    Besides these perks, the card comes with a 3-point-per-dollar rate on restaurants and travel, including Lyft, after the $300 annual travel credit. Speaking of the credit, it applies to most travel purchases, including rides with Lyft.

    The Chase Sapphire Reserve card is one of the best travel credit cards on the market, but it also comes with a rather high price – the card charges an annual fee of $550. If you don’t travel often enough to justify the fee, you might want to look into cards that have a lower annual fee or none at all.

    Here are more details:

    • One-year complimentary Lyft Pink membership (a $199 value)
    • 10 points per dollar on Lyft purchases through March 2022
    • 3 points per dollar spent on restaurants and travel,
    • $300 annual credit travel that applies to most travel purchases, including rides with Lyft
    • 50,000-point sign-up bonus if you spend $4,000 in first three months
    • Redeem points through the Chase Ultimate Rewards portal, and get 50% more travel for free
    • Transfer points to airline and hotel partners at a 1:1 ratio
    • Up to $100 Global Entry/TSA Precheck credit every four years
    • Priority Pass Select membership
    • $550 annual fee

    exciting new benefits for its World and World Elite credit card members. This includes a $10 Lyft credit for World Elite cardholders, which will be automatically applied to your next ride after you take five Lyft rides within a calendar month. The most popular World Elite Mastercards include the Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card*, the Citi Prestige® Card and the Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite Mastercard.

    Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card: Best for extra value at a lower annual fee

    Similar to the Chase Sapphire Reserve, the Chase Sapphire Preferred rewards cardholders for eating out (or ordering takeout) and traveling and offers 5 points per dollar on Lyft through March 2022. The base rewards rate is lower at 2 points per dollar on dining and travel and 1 point per dollar on other purchases, but the annual fee is also lower at $95.

    If you’re not ready to shell out $550 per year that the Reserve charges, the Preferred can be a better alternative. Plus, it offers a higher sign-up bonus than the Reserve – you’ll get 60,000 points after you spend $4,000 in the first three months (compare with a 50,000-point sign-up bonus if you spend $4,000 in first three months on the Reserve).

    Take a look at the card details:

    American Express® Green Card: Best for budget-minded travelers

    Another credit card that offers rewards for travel and transit (including ride-shares such as Lyft) is the American Express Green Card. While it doesn’t offer the luxury travel perks other Amex cards are known for, it can be a good choice for budget-minded travelers. With this card, you can get 3 points per dollar on dining, travel and transit, and 1 point per dollar on everything else. The Amex Green also comes with perks such as up to $100 in annual statement credits for LoungeBuddy purchases and up to $100 per year for CLEAR membership.

    complimentary Uber Eats Pass membership for up to 12 months if you enroll by Dec. 31, 2021.

    Here’s what the card offers at a glance:

    Wells Fargo Propel American Express® card: Best no annual fee card for ride shares

    If you’re looking for a credit card that would earn you rewards on Lyft rides and not charge an annual fee, the Wells Fargo Propel American Express is definitely an option worth looking into.

    The card earns 3 points per dollar in numerous categories, including dining out, gas stations, transit, flights, hotels, homestays, car rentals and select streaming services – and ride-shares. All other purchases earn 1 point per dollar. You can choose to redeem your rewards for flights through Go Far Rewards or statement credits.

    Here’s a closer look:

    More ways to maximize rewards (and save money) when you pay for ride-sharing services

    While using the right credit card can help you score more rewards each time you ride with Lyft, there are other ways to make the most of your ride-share spending. Here are some tips that can help you maximize each dollar you spend, save money and even earn airline miles:

    Bottom line

    To find the best cards for Lyft to share with you, we’ve compared all cards that offer benefits and perks related to ride-sharing and Lyft specifically. These cards can help you maximize your potential earnings and savings on Lyft rides, and if you use Lyft frequently, one of these products can be a great addition to your wallet.

    *All information about the Capital One Savor Cash Rewards Credit Card has been collected independently by CreditCards.com and has not been reviewed by the issuer. Capital One Savor Credit Card is no longer available through CreditCards.com.

    Source: creditcards.com

    Don’t Freak Out About the Recent Mortgage Rate ‘Spike’

    Queue the panic. Mortgage rates have officially spiked and the media is all over it. Yep, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage increased from 2.65% to 2.79% this week, per Freddie Mac’s weekly survey. Freddie Mac Chief Economist Sam Khater noted in the weekly news release that mortgage rates have been under pressure [&hellip

    The post Don’t Freak Out About the Recent Mortgage Rate ‘Spike’ first appeared on The Truth About Mortgage.

    Source: thetruthaboutmortgage.com

    What Is New-House Smell? A Reality Check on the Risks, and How To Get Rid of It

    new house smellMaría Garrido / EyeEm / Getty Images

    While most of us are familiar with new-car smell—that distinct scent of a brand-new automobile—home buyers might have caught a whiff of another scent entirely during their home-shopping spree: new-house smell.

    What exactly is new-house smell? Also known as new-construction smell, it’s essentially a combination of smells given off by the many materials that go into building a house—things like fresh paint, carpet, wood, and adhesives. If there’s any new furniture in the home, that could be contributing to the smell as well.

    But is new-house smell unhealthy to breathe in, day after day? Here’s a closer look at what new-house smell is made of, and how to get rid of it, too.

    What is new-house smell?

    Before we dive deep into new-house smell, let’s take a step back—way back—and look at what causes anything to smell in the first place.

    Bill Carroll Jr., an adjunct professor of chemistry at Indiana University, says all smells come from molecules in the air that your nose can detect. The molecules must evaporate to get into the air, and the more likely they are to evaporate, the more volatile they are and the easier they are to inhale and detect as odors.

    “If you can smell it, it’s because of a molecule in the air,” Carroll says. “The fact that it’s in the air means that it is a volatile compound at least to some extent.”

    As scary as “volatile” sounds, it doesn’t necessarily mean a substance is dangerous or explosive. Carroll says it simply means that something can easily evaporate into the atmosphere, thus releasing an odor. For example, he says metals aren’t very volatile, which is why you probably don’t smell much (hopefully) if you sniff your stainless-steel refrigerator. Other materials like paints, adhesives, and plastics, however, are more highly volatile.

    Are VOCs dangerous?

    While new-house smells aren’t necessarily dangerous, there is some concern about certain types of volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, that exist in some building materials (e.g., paint, carpet, and furniture). Some have been linked to health issues, including cancer and central nervous system damage in people (e.g., construction workers who don’t wear face masks) exposed to high quantities of such materials.

    “When you talk about VOCs that raise health concerns, that goes more to a substance’s inherent toxicity or reactivity,” Carroll says. “It’s the difference between smelling a banana and smelling paint stripper, for example. They’re both volatile, but they have very different toxicities.”

    “Regardless of odor, the ability of some of the VOCs emitted from any of [building] products and materials to cause health impacts or create other dangerous conditions varies greatly, depending on several factors,” according to the Environmental Protection Agency. “These factors may include the type and amount of VOCs emitted, the toxicity of the individual and combined VOCs, the ventilation rate in the space, the type and amount of other materials in the space, occupant level of exposure and length of time exposed, and the health of the exposed occupants.”

    However, this is definitely not to say that a new-house smell will make you sick.

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    Watch: Get Smoker’s Smell Out of Your House for Good—Here’s How

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    The good news is that because of concerns raised over certain dangerous VOCs in the past 40 to 50 years, there’s a been a strong movement to reduce them. Carroll says that’s most apparent in regard to paint. While oil-based paints used to emit high levels of VOCs and the odor would linger for a long time, today’s paints contain virtually no VOCs and their odor dissipates more quickly.

    In general, that means new houses today have much less of a pronounced smell than they did a years ago—and are less hazardous. For the overwhelming majority of the population, the odor is at worst a nuisance.

    To reduce any potential indoor air–related health impacts from VOCs, the EPA recommends using low-emitting products and building materials and increasing ventilation. The agency also offers further information on VOCs and indoor air auality.

    How to get rid of new-house smell

    “If you like new-house smell, that’s OK,” Carroll says. “If you don’t, it’s important to remember that the solution is dilution.”

    He says for an empty house, that means opening the windows to air things out, and usually in a matter of days that new-house smell will disappear. Another solution is to “bake” a new home. Since some VOCs evaporate more quickly at higher heats, this technique has a homeowner turn up the heat in the unoccupied house for a few days while running fans to push them out the windows. Running exhaust fans and using an air purifier may speed things up, too.

    Carroll says what’s more concerning than new-house smell, however, is what you bring into your place on your own.

    “The greatest source of VOCs is the stuff you bring into your house,” Carroll says. Items such as furniture, cleaners, waxes, and fragrances expose people to far more VOCs over the course of a lifetime.

    Know this: If you’re moving into a new home and get a whiff of that telltale new-house smell, it will eventually wear off, even if you do nothing. Promise.

    The post What Is New-House Smell? A Reality Check on the Risks, and How To Get Rid of It appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

    Source: realtor.com